SOVIET UKRAINE PHILOSOPHY OF THE SECOND HALF OF THE 20TH CENTURY IN THE ASSESSMENTS OF WESTERN PHILOSOPHERS OF THE TIME: IMAGE OF THE KYIV PHILOSOPHICAL SCHOOL OF THE 1950S – FIRST HALF OF THE 1960S

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17721/2523-4064.2021/5-1/8

Keywords:

Ukrainian philosophy, philosophical thought of the Ukrainian diaspora, Kyiv philosophical school, Institute of Philosophy of the Academy of Sciences of the Ukrainian SSR, D. Ostryanin, P. Kopnin, M. Honcharenko, P. Fedenko, M. Solovey

Abstract

The article deals with the problem of the rise in the 1950s – first half of the 1960s, in the context of the formation of the idea of the Soviet Ukraine philosophy in the Western world, of the image of the Kyiv philosophical school as a prominent participant in the international scientific process of the Cold War era. This school emerged during Khrushchev’s “thaw” or stage of metamorphosis of the USSR from Stalinism to neo-Stalinist stagnation, namely between the XX (1956) and XXIV (1971) Congresses of the CPSU. It was the leading ideological and organizational center of the philosophical life of the Ukrainian SSR during the geopolitical struggle of the Eastern and Western military-political blocs under the leadership of the USSR and the USA. The Kyiv philosophical school was the main representative of Soviet Ukraine in its dialogue with world philosophical thought established in the mid-1960s. This school, mainly its Ukrainian historical and philosophical achievements of the 1950s – 1970s, became the central object of study of the Soviet philosophy by philosophers and scientific institutions of the USA, Western Germany and other countries of the Western bloc in the second half of the XX century. This study can be divided into three conditional stages: 1. the preparatory one during the transition from Stalinism to Khrushchev’s “thaw”(late 1940s – early 1960s); 2. of scientific international interaction in the conditions of ideological confrontation during the transition from “thaw” to neo-Stalinist “stagnation” (early 1960s – early 1970s); 3. of intensification of the ideological struggle during the transition from “stagnation” to Gorbachev’s “perestroika” (early 1970s – second half of the 1980s). During the first and beginning of the second of these stages, the philosophers of the  diaspora P. Fedenko and D. Solovey began a critical analysis of the Shevchenko work of the director of the Institute of Philosophy of the Academy of Sciences of the Ukrainian SSR D. Ostryanin. They carried it out in the context of active participation in Soviet philosophical studies together with their colleagues W. Barka, S. Galamay, B. Kravciv, M. Kushnir and, also, already well-known scientists A. Kultschytzkyj, I. Mirtschuk and W. Janiw. No less important evidence of the nature of the perception of the Soviet philosophical thought by professors of universities in Western Europe and the United States in the first half of the 1960s are memories of foreign meetings with them of the founders of the Kyiv philosophical school, first of all the director of the mentioned institute P. Kopnin and his deputy M. Honcharenko.

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Published

2021-12-29

How to Cite

Vdovychenko, H. (2021). SOVIET UKRAINE PHILOSOPHY OF THE SECOND HALF OF THE 20TH CENTURY IN THE ASSESSMENTS OF WESTERN PHILOSOPHERS OF THE TIME: IMAGE OF THE KYIV PHILOSOPHICAL SCHOOL OF THE 1950S – FIRST HALF OF THE 1960S. Bulletin of Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv. Philosophy, 2(5), 5-17. https://doi.org/10.17721/2523-4064.2021/5-1/8